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Understanding Bilingual Stories: Literature Review

  • YiXi LaMuCuo
Chapter
Part of the Multilingual Education book series (MULT, volume 34)

Abstract

This literature review demonstrates that bilingualism is a global issue. More and more minority people are becoming bilingual simply because their mother tongue/father tongue is not the majority language of their countries. This review further shows the complexities of developing bilingualism, a process which is heavily linked with social and political changes in society. This study focuses on the lived experiences of five Tibetan people growing up and going to school in Tibetan areas of China. I seek to understand how their language experiences in school and at home have been affected by the changing of policy. This research therefore goes further than previous studies in seeking to deepen our understanding of bilingualism, its links to socio-political and historical changes for language minority groups and individuals and the implications for education. This research contributes to the understanding of bilingualism from a socio-political perspective, which has rarely been the focus of other studies.

Keywords

Becoming bilinguals Lived experiences Mother tongue Father tongue First language Second language Minority language Involuntary minority Voluntary minority Language policy 

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Authors and Affiliations

  • YiXi LaMuCuo
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Tibetan Culture & LanguageNorthwest Minzu UniversityLanzhouChina

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