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Protein Sources in the Modern Food Industry. Are Vegan Foods the Right Choice?

  • Suresh D. SharmaEmail author
  • Michele Barone
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Molecular Science book series (BRIEFSMOLECULAR)

Abstract

The current industry of foods and beverages has modified the market in recent years. One of the most interesting modifications concerning dietary patterns in Western Countries at least has been the emersion of so-called vegan foods. By the chemical viewpoint, the formulation of similar foods can be promising because many vegetable ingredients are good protein sources. The basic advantages of these productions—and vegan foods themselves—are: the absence of taste; eco-friendly methods for agriculture and industrial transformation; lower prices if compared with animal protein sources; possibility of new and improved ‘surrogate’ products; and improved technological features. In addition, veganism concerns one or more of the following motivations: ethical reasons; repugnance for food of animal origin; health reasons; explicit preference for vegetable/vegetarian foods and patterns; and social pressure in terms of persuasion. However, could these animal imitation foods give the ‘right’ amount of proteins to vegan and normal consumers? The problem of proteins should be discussed in terms of essential amino acids for the human being. Vegan-style diets may have good effects on certain patients; however, the energy intake related to proteins is significantly lower when non-vegetarian people. Also, the supplementation of some deficient vitamins, dietary fibres, and certain metals is recommended.

Keywords

All trans-fatty acids Iron Soy protein Veganism Vegetarianism Vitamin B12 Zinc 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Biochemistry and Molecular BiologyPennsylvania State UniversityUniversity Park, State CollegeUSA
  2. 2.Associazione “Componiamo il Futuro” (CO.I.F.)PalermoItaly

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