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Early Theories of Amusement

  • Alan RobertsEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, I uncritically review early theories of amusement in order to extract key claims for critical assessment in Chapters  4 and  5. In Section 1, I defend the essentialist approach to Question 1 from Chapter  1, in Section 2, I review early superiority theories, in Section 3, I review early incongruity theories, in Section 4, I review early release theories and, in Section 5, I review early play theories. Finally, in Section 6, I summarise the key claims of this chapter.

Keywords

Amusement Essentialist Superiority Incongruity Release Play 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyUniversity of SussexBrightonUK

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