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The Test of Ubiquitous Through Real or Interactional Expertise (TURINEX) and Veganism as Expertise

  • Andrew Berardy
  • Thomas Seager
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter introduces the use of TURINEX, a test designed to assess communicative competence acquired through experiences that are insufficient to impart interactional expertise, but advance students beyond the novice stage. TURINEX mimics imitation games and may result in a finding of interactional competence instead of interactional expertise. Interactional competence is sufficient communicative competence to interact with experts on their level but not sufficient to sound like an expert themselves.

Keywords

Interactional expertise Competence Communication 

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew Berardy
    • 1
  • Thomas Seager
    • 1
  1. 1.Arizona State UniversityTempeUSA

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