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A Case of Growing Up? A Feminist Critique of Maturational Theory

  • Úna BarrEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Critical Criminological Perspectives book series (CCRP)

Abstract

This chapter examines the ontogenetic perspective of desistance theory, concluding that it offers an incomplete and gender-blind approach to explaining contemporary female desistance journeys. This chapter analyses three trajectories of transgressing the law experienced by the women involved in the research; early-onset, late-onset and one-off transgressions of the law. These trajectories contest the findings of authors such as Gottfredson and Hirschi (A General Theory of Crime. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1990) that desistance is something which happens naturally with the passage of time. Instead, this chapter will argue for a critical analysis of desistance, rooted in feminist theory and epistemology.

Keywords

Maturational theory Feminism Trajectories Early-Onset Late-Onset 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Humanities and Social ScienceLiverpool John Moores UniversityLiverpoolUK

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