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Conduct Learning Events Professionally

  • William J. RothwellEmail author
  • Sandra L. Williams
  • Aileen G. Zaballero
Chapter
  • 19 Downloads

Abstract

Learning and development as a field has evolved and grown in its importance, particularly because of its impact on job performance and organizational outcomes. Learning and development practitioners have the responsibility of developing strategies for the organization to prosper through learning, and are essential to overall employee development. Learning and development practitioners are critical to the organization’s talent pipeline. Therefore, it is important to professionalize training. This chapter will build upon the previous chapter’s discussion about trainer qualifications. The evolution of the training profession will be briefly reviewed. Educational accomplishments, work experiences, and competencies needed to become an effective learning and development professional will be further explored. Finally, this chapter will address the importance of maintaining high professional standards, including disclosure of conflicts of interest and non-discriminatory behavior in conducting trainings.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • William J. Rothwell
    • 1
    Email author
  • Sandra L. Williams
    • 2
  • Aileen G. Zaballero
    • 3
  1. 1.The Pennsylvania State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA
  2. 2.Northeastern Illinois UniversityChicagoUSA
  3. 3.Rothwell & Associates, LLCState CollegeUSA

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