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Young Adults’ Attitudes Toward Borrowing

  • Amelie GambleEmail author
  • Tommy Gärling
  • Patrik Michaelsen
Chapter

Abstract

Several scales for measuring attitude that have been developed are first described and evaluated. It is noted that the scales frequently fail to distinguish between opinions and attitudes and that the attitude object varies between studies. Studies of young adults’ attitudes toward borrowing are then reviewed. A majority have focused on student loans. It is found that attitudes are favorable although a change over time toward less favorable attitudes is discernible. A critical issue is to what extent favorable attitudes are related to borrowing. Some but not all studies confirm a positive relationship between favorable attitudes toward borrowing and debt amount. The causal direction of the relationship may however vary over time and in different groups.

Keywords

Young adult Borrowing Debt Attitude Decision 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amelie Gamble
    • 1
    Email author
  • Tommy Gärling
    • 1
  • Patrik Michaelsen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of GothenburgGöteborgSweden

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