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Perfectly Matched and Perfectly Timed

  • Aaron Gurwitz
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in American Economic History book series (AEH)

Abstract

One path toward an understanding of why the New York City economy grew faster than that of other large U.S. cities around the turn of the twentieth century runs through an analysis of the motivations and endowments of the City’s large populations of Southern Italian and East European Jewish immigrants.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aaron Gurwitz
    • 1
  1. 1.New YorkUSA

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