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Global City, Mark 1

  • Aaron Gurwitz
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in American Economic History book series (AEH)

Abstract

The conditions that foster the international movement of goods, money, and people, which characterized all of the displaced nineteenth century, became more pronounced in the years between 1870 and 1914 than they had been before or would be again until late in the twentieth century. This was also the period of New York City’s most dramatic growth, both absolute and relative to the United States as a whole. Chapters  10 and  11 trace the connections between these two historical developments. The first of these chapters begins by asking why Chicago, which was geographically much closer to the U.S. population center and to the bulk of its economic activity, did not overtake New York as the nation’s largest City. The general answer to this question is that New York was better positioned than any other U.S. city to make the most of accelerating globalization.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aaron Gurwitz
    • 1
  1. 1.New YorkUSA

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