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Agent Based Modeling of Smart Grids in Smart Cities

  • Bauyrzhan Omarov
  • Aigerim Altayeva
  • Alma Turganbayeva
  • Glyussya Abdulkarimova
  • Farida Gusmanova
  • Alua Sarbasova
  • Batyrkhan OmarovEmail author
  • Yergali Dauletbek
  • Aizhan Altayeva
  • Nurzhan Omarov
Conference paper
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 947)

Abstract

The goal of the study is to explore Smart Grids with a system of multi-agents and aspects related to the Internet. Smart cities are created at a high level of information and communication technologies (ICT) structures capable of transmitting energy, information flows multidirectional and linking another sector that includes mobility, energy, social and economic. Smart cities concern the connection of subsystems, the exchange and evaluation of data, as well as ensuring the quality of life and meeting the needs of citizens. We have different models of transport systems, energy optimization, street lighting systems, building management systems, urban transport optimization, but these models are currently being considered separately. In this article, we present an overview of the concept of an intelligent city and discuss why multi-agent systems are the right tool for modeling intelligent cities. This article represents simulation results with a Smart Grid as a case study of Smart City.

Keywords

Smart grid Smart City Multi-agents Agent based modeling 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bauyrzhan Omarov
    • 1
  • Aigerim Altayeva
    • 2
  • Alma Turganbayeva
    • 1
  • Glyussya Abdulkarimova
    • 3
  • Farida Gusmanova
    • 1
  • Alua Sarbasova
    • 1
  • Batyrkhan Omarov
    • 2
    Email author
  • Yergali Dauletbek
    • 2
  • Aizhan Altayeva
    • 2
  • Nurzhan Omarov
    • 4
  1. 1.Al-Farabi Kazakh National UniversityAlmatyKazakhstan
  2. 2.International Information Technologies UniversityAlmatyKazakhstan
  3. 3.Abai Kazakh National Pedagogical UniversityAlmatyKazakhstan
  4. 4.Kazakh University of Railways and CommunicationsAlmatyKazakhstan

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