Advertisement

Monitoring and Mapping of Deterioration Products on Cultural Heritage Monuments Using Imaging and Laser Spectroscopy

  • Kostas HatzigiannakisEmail author
  • Kristalia Melessanaki
  • Aggelos Philippidis
  • Olga Kokkinaki
  • Eleni Kalokairinou
  • Panagiotis Siozos
  • Paraskevi Pouli
  • Elpida Politaki
  • Aggeliki Psaroudaki
  • Aristides Dokoumetzidis
  • Elissavet Katsaveli
  • Elissavet Kavoulaki
  • Vassiliki Sithiakaki
Conference paper
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 962)

Abstract

Cultural Heritage (CH) outdoor monuments are susceptible to severe and extreme weather phenomena as a result of the climatic change. The prompt detection and analysis, as well as the continuous monitoring of weathering formations and deterioration products is thus crucial for their preservation and longevity.

The HERACLES project (HEritage Resilience Against CLimate Events on Site, GA 700395) aims to develop, apply and establish responsive methodologies and systems towards the mitigation of the impact caused by climate changes on the monuments and thus a multi‐disciplinary research is in progress. One of the HERACLES tasks is to develop a diagnostic methodology, which will closely observe the generation and evolution of surface deterioration products on the basis of remote monitoring and mapping and in correlation with environmental data and in-situ characterization of materials.

This is implemented by means of imaging spectroscopy which, at specific wavelengths, allows the differentiation of the encrustations from stone substrates. The spectral data, recorded seasonally in‐situ, on the monument, are processed and compared in order to map the spatial evolution of the pathologies. In parallel, in‐situ Raman and LIBS spectroscopic measurements are performed for the chemical characterization of the studied materials, while the environmental conditions are continuously recorded. The acquired data are cross‐correlated in order to elucidate the nature, understand the deterioration mechanism and determine any correlation of deterioration products with climatic changes.

The methodology is initially designed on two of the HERACLES test beds; the Palace of Knossos and the Venetian coastal fortress of Koules. Both monuments located in the city of Heraklion, Crete, Greece are representative of important historical eras, involve a number of construction materials and are subjected to various climatic conditions. This methodology, directly connected with the HERACLES ICT platform for responsive monitoring of the studied test‐beds, is envisaged to be broadly implemented in the future to other CH monuments.

Keywords

Climate change CH monuments Monitoring of deterioration products 

References

  1. 1.
    Papliaka, Z.E., et al.: Pigments characterization in Russian icons in Greece (15th-20th CE) using portable laser spectroscopic instruments. Heritage Sci. 4, 15 (2016)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Westlake, P., et al.: Studying pigments on painted plaster in Minoan, Roman and early Byzantine Crete. A multi-analytical technique approach. Anal. Bioanal. Chem. 402, 1413–1432 (2012)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Giakoumaki, A., Melessanaki, K., Anglos, D.: Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in archaeological science-applications and prospects. Anal. Bioanal. Chem. 387, 749–760 (2007)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Klein, S., Hildenhagen, J., Dickmann, K., Stratoudaki, T., Zafiropulos, V.: LIBS-spectroscopy for monitoring and control of the laser cleaning process of stone and medieval glass. J. Cult. Heritage 1(Suppl. 1), S287–S292 (2000)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Osticioli, I., Mendes, N.F.C., Porcinai, S., Cagnini, A., Castellucci, E.: Spectroscopic analysis of works of art using a single LIBS and pulsed Raman setup. Anal. Bioanal. Chem. 394(4), 1033–1041 (2009)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Madariaga, J.M., et al.: In situ analysis with portable Raman and ED-XRF spectrometers for the diagnosis of the formation of efflorescence on walls and wall paintings of the Insula IX 3 (Pompeii, Italy). J. Raman Spectrosc. 45, 1059–1067 (2014)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Vandenabeele, P., Edwards, H.G.M., Moens, L.: A decade of Raman spectroscopy in art and archaeology. Chem. Rev. 107, 675–686 (2007)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Liang, H.: Advances in multispectral and hyperspectral imaging for archaeology and art conservation. Appl. Phys. A 106(2), 309–323 (2011)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Zacharopoulos, A., et al.: A method for the registration of spectral images of paintings and its evaluation. J. Cult. Heritage 29, 10–18 (2018)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Baker, J., et al.: The height of Denier Tournois minting in Greece (1289–1313) according to new archaeometric data. Annu. Brit. Sch. Athens 112, 267–307 (2017)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Siozos, P., Philippidis, A., Hadjistefanou, M., Gounarakis, C., Anglos, D.: Chemical analysis of industrial scale deposits by combined use of correlation coefficients with emission line detection of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy spectra. Spectrochim. Acta, Part B 87, 86–91 (2013)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    The RRUFF Project database of Raman spectra, X-ray diffraction and chemistry data for minerals. http://rruff.info. Accessed 29 Oct 2018

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kostas Hatzigiannakis
    • 1
    Email author
  • Kristalia Melessanaki
    • 1
  • Aggelos Philippidis
    • 1
  • Olga Kokkinaki
    • 1
  • Eleni Kalokairinou
    • 1
  • Panagiotis Siozos
    • 1
  • Paraskevi Pouli
    • 1
  • Elpida Politaki
    • 2
  • Aggeliki Psaroudaki
    • 2
  • Aristides Dokoumetzidis
    • 2
  • Elissavet Katsaveli
    • 2
  • Elissavet Kavoulaki
    • 2
  • Vassiliki Sithiakaki
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (IESL-FORTH)Heraklion, CreteGreece
  2. 2.Ephorate of Antiquities of HeraklionHeraklionGreece

Personalised recommendations