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Wind Field Variability in Complex Terrain: Lessons from the Hardanger Bridge

  • A. FenerciEmail author
  • O. Øiseth
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Civil Engineering book series (LNCE, volume 27)

Abstract

Along the Coastal Highway E39 in the western coast of Norway, Norwegian Government is planning to build several extreme bridges spanning from 1.5 to 5 km. The region is typically mountainous with deep fjords seeping inland. Here, experience gained from a 5-year monitoring campaign on the Hardanger Bridge in Norway is summarized relating to this ambitious project. The analysis of data provided valuable knowledge on the wind characteristics, which can be generalized for the whole region. Insight has also been gained on the dynamic behaviour of the bridge and how it is influenced by the wind conditions. The results are presented and discussed here with the future bridges in mind.

Keywords

Suspension bridge Turbulence characteristics Buffeting response Complex topography Probabilistic modelling 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Structural EngineeringNorwegian University of Science and TechnologyTrondheimNorway

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