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King of Queens’

  • Ashwani Saith
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in the History of Economic Thought book series (PHET)

Abstract

Queens’ College, where Ajit was successively Fellow, Senior Fellow, and Life Fellow was more than just a nominal affiliation: it became his permanent base, fortress and gurdwara, and he was devoted to it. He was “Mr Economics”—as Director of Studies, he assembled a team that projected Queens’ into the top echelon of economics teaching. An inspirational and pluralistic teacher, he enabled students how to think, not what to think; not to follow his leftist beliefs but to formulate and argue their own; he taught and demanded theoretical clarity, methodological rigour and policy relevance. Ajit’s unabated support for students’ rights and Vietnam made him unpopular in some official circles. He was the fulcrum for cross-border gatherings for South Asian students. Significantly, he initiated the weekly Queens’ Economics Seminar, a congenial debating chamber for the heterodox personages and lineages of Cambridge economics. A grateful College honoured its favourite son in several ways.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ashwani Saith
    • 1
  1. 1.International Institute of Social StudiesErasmus University RotterdamThe HagueThe Netherlands

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