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The “Disappeared”: Civilian Victims of Enforced Disappearances in Pakistan

  • Vasja Badalič
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Victims and Victimology book series (PSVV)

Abstract

This chapter explores the impact of enforced disappearances on the civilian population in Pakistan. The first section of the chapter examines the practices used by Pakistan’s security forces to conceal the fate and whereabouts of the “disappeared” (e.g., not registering detainees, locking detainees in secret detention facilities, frequently transferring detainees between secret detention facilities…). The second section examines the deaths of detainees who “disappeared” while being held by the Pakistani security forces. The section argues that such deaths should be regarded as prima facie arbitrary executions. The last, third section examines how the Pakistani authorities failed to address the problem of enforced disappearances and, consequently, helped create a culture of impunity for those responsible for disappearances.

Keywords

Pakistan Pakistan’s military Civilian victims Enforced disappearances Deaths in custody Human rights 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vasja Badalič
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Criminology at the Faculty of LawLjubljanaSlovenia

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