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Stem Cells

  • Ajax Yang
  • Corey W. Hunter
  • Tory L. McJunkin
  • Paul J. Lynch
  • Edward L. Swing
Chapter

Abstract

There has been a growing and sustained interest in the advancement in stem cell technology in pain medicine due to limitations in medical and surgical interventions in treating common chronic pain conditions such as low back pain, osteoarthritis, and various tendinopathies. In this chapter, we will outline the basic mechanisms, application, and current evidence supporting stem cell therapeutics.

Keywords

Stem cells Regenerative medicine Adult mesenchymal cells Tissue engineering Adipose-derived stromal cells Stromal vascular fraction Bone marrow aspirate concentrate BMAC SVF 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ajax Yang
    • 1
  • Corey W. Hunter
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tory L. McJunkin
    • 3
  • Paul J. Lynch
    • 3
  • Edward L. Swing
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Rehabilitation MedicineIcahn School of Medicine at Mount SinaiNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Ainsworth Institute of Pain ManagementNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Arizona Pain SpecialistsScottsdaleUSA

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