Advertisement

The Role of Tertiary Education in Regional Development in Greece

  • Th. Stefanos Papailias
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Proceedings in Business and Economics book series (SPBE)

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the economic as well as the social contribution of tertiary education in the region of Greece.

Since 1980 in Greece, tertiary education is growing rapidly, and a huge amount of universities and faculties have been established all over the country, especially in the regional areas.

In the following article, regional inflow–outflow tables are compiled that illustrate the connection between education and other domains of economy. They also illustrate the contribution of tertiary education in gross production value for the period 1995–2010.

Furthermore, it presents an extended research using questionnaires in regard to the economic impact of tertiary education in the regional areas.

Therefore, a comparison of the research findings (micro approach) with the results of the inflow–outflow tables (macro approach) is made in order to indicate the positive multiplier effects of tertiary education in regional areas.

The innovation–contribution of this study is that there will be an estimation of the benefits of tertiary education in regional areas, using macro approach, through inflow–outflow tables, an approach Greek bibliography lacks in this day and age. Lastly, these tables will be compared with the results of the above research.

Keywords

Tertiary education Regional development Inflow–outflow tables Gross production value Benefits 

References

  1. Arbo, P., & Benneworth, P. (2007). Understanding the regional contribution of higher education institutions. A literature review. OECD, Institutional Management in Higher Education Programme.Google Scholar
  2. Barro, J. (1997). Determinants of economic growth: A cross-section empirical study. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  3. Bartik, T. J. (2004). Increasing the economic development benefits of higher education in Michigan. W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, No. 04–106.Google Scholar
  4. Becker, G. S. (1962). Investment in human capital: A theoretical analysis. Journal of Political Economy, 70(5, Part 2), 9–49.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Becker, G. S. (1964). Human capital. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Bloom, D., Canning, D., & Chan, K. (2005). Higher education and economic development in Africa. Research commissioned by the World Bank. Cambridge: Harvard University.Google Scholar
  7. Gikas, G., Bitxava, A., & Diakomixalis, M. (2006). Estimation of economic impact at the local economy from the Operation of Technological Educational Institute of Epirus. In Conference Proceedings 3rd International Research of Technological Educational Institute of Epirus, Education and Economic Development (pp. 103–113). Preveza.Google Scholar
  8. Livas, P. (1994). Analysis inflow-outflow. Athens: Stamoulis.Google Scholar
  9. OECD. (2011). Education at a glance. Paris: OECD.Google Scholar
  10. Papakostantinou, G. (2000). The cost of education: Since the withdrawal of the state in “competitive” infiltration family. Athens: National Centre for Social Research.Google Scholar
  11. Papakostantinou, G. (2003). Supply and demand of higher education. Athens: Metexmio.Google Scholar
  12. Psaharopoulos, G., & Kazamias, A. (1985). Education and development in Greece: Social and economic study of higher education. Athens: National Centre for Social Research.Google Scholar
  13. Schultz, T. (1960). Capital formation by education. Journal of Political Economy, 68, 571–583.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Schultz, T. (1961). Education and economic growth. In N. B. Henry (Ed.), Social forces influencing American education. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  15. Schultz, T. (1964). The economic value of education. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  16. Skountzos, Th. (2004). Regional economic analysis and policy (Vol. B). Athens: Stamoulis.Google Scholar
  17. Skountzos, T., & Livas, P. (2000). National economic accounts. Athens: Stamoulis.Google Scholar
  18. Skountzos, T., & Stroblos, N. (2007). Relations branch of the Greek economy in national and regional level. Athens: Athens Academy.Google Scholar
  19. Technological Educational Institute of Epirus, Department of Igoumenitsa. (2004). Reforming course of study.Google Scholar
  20. Technological Educational Institute of Epirus, Department of Preveza. (2004). Reforming course of study.Google Scholar
  21. Technological Educational Institute of Peloponnese, Department of Local Government. (2004). Reforming course of study.Google Scholar
  22. Tsounis, N. (2006). Universities and Regional Development: The case of TEI of Western Macedonia. In Conference Proceedings of 3rd International Research of Technological Educational Institute of Epirus, Education and Economic Development (pp. 65–80). Preveza.Google Scholar
  23. Western Macedonia University of Applied Sciences, Department of Florina. (2005). Reforming course of study.Google Scholar
  24. Yotopoulos, P., & Nugent, J. (1976). Economics of development, empirical investigations (Vol. 59, No. 2, pp. 406–408). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Th. Stefanos Papailias
    • 1
  1. 1.Hellenic Quality Assurance and Accreditation Agency (HQA)AthensGreece

Personalised recommendations