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Women’s Health

  • Nese YukselEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Two areas in women’s health where pharmacists play an important role are menopause management and contraception. Assessing women who are having menopausal symptoms and helping women make informed decisions regarding hormone therapy are integral parts of menopause management. Follow-up of women who have started on hormone therapy includes monitoring for symptom improvement, breakthrough bleeding, adverse effects, and adherence to therapy. Initial assessment of the woman for combined hormonal contraceptives (CHC) involves capturing a menstrual history, medical history to screen for CHC contraindications and risks, previous use of contraceptives, and patient preferences for contraception. A baseline blood pressure should also be completed. Women who have started on CHC should be monitored for satisfaction with the chosen method, breakthrough bleeding, adverse effects, and adherence.

Keywords

Women’s health Menopause Hormone therapy Contraception Hormonal contraceptives 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Alberta, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical SciencesEdmontonCanada

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