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Multimodal Brain Tumor Segmentation Using Cascaded V-Nets

  • Rui Hua
  • Quan Huo
  • Yaozong Gao
  • Yu Sun
  • Feng ShiEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 11384)

Abstract

In this work, we propose a novel cascaded V-Nets method to segment brain tumor substructures in multimodal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although V-Net has been successfully used in many segmentation tasks, we demonstrate that its performance could be further enhanced by using a cascaded structure and ensemble strategy. Briefly, our baseline V-Net consists of four levels with encoding and decoding paths and intra- and inter-path skip connections. Focal loss is chosen to improve performance on hard samples as well as balance the positive and negative samples. We further propose three preprocessing pipelines for multimodal MRI images to train different models. By ensembling the segmentation probability maps obtained from these models, segmentation result is further improved. In other hand, we propose to segment the whole tumor first, and then divide it into tumor necrosis, edema, and enhancing tumor. Experimental results on BraTS 2018 online validation set achieve average Dice scores of 0.9048, 0.8364 and 0.7748 for whole tumor, tumor core and enhancing tumor, respectively. The corresponding values for BraTS 2018 online testing set are 0.8761, 0.7953 and 0.7364, respectively. We further make a prediction of patient overall survival by ensembling multiple classifiers for long, mid and short groups, and achieve accuracy of 0.519, mean square error of 367239 and Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.168.

Keywords

Deep learning Brain tumor Segmentation V-Net 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rui Hua
    • 1
    • 2
  • Quan Huo
    • 2
  • Yaozong Gao
    • 2
  • Yu Sun
    • 1
  • Feng Shi
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.School of Biomedical EngineeringSoutheast UniversityNanjingChina
  2. 2.United Imaging IntelligenceShanghaiChina

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