Advertisement

Resuscitating Georg Lukács: Form, Metaphysics, and the Idea of a New Realism

  • Ulf Schulenberg
Chapter

Abstract

Even when Georg Lukács’s texts are governed by a redemptive notion of form, and even when his critique of the modernist hypostatization of form from today’s perspective seems misguided and ideological, it is still possible to use his insights in order to theorize what Fredric Jameson has called “a new realism.” At the center of Schulenberg’s discussion of Lukács’s work in this chapter is therefore the following question: How to resuscitate a metaphysical thinker, or materialist metaphysician, in postmetaphysical times? Although Schulenberg’s reading of Lukács is at least partly influenced by contemporary critiques of representationalism and foundationalism, he at the same time argues that rereading this Marxist philosopher in the twenty-first century urges us to retheorize those concepts and categories we thought we would not need anymore: form, totality, and representation (or mapping). Hence, Lukács’s work can provoke us to rethink the modern antifoundationalist story of progress.

Bibliography

  1. Adorno, T. W. (1977). Reconciliation under Duress (R. Livingstone, Trans.). In T. W. Adorno et al., Aesthetics and Politics (pp. 151–176). London and New York: Verso.Google Scholar
  2. Adorno, T. W. (1981). Noten zur Literatur. Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp.Google Scholar
  3. Best, S. (1989). Jameson, Totality, and the Poststructuralist Critique. In D. Kellner (Ed.), Postmodernism/Jameson/Critique (pp. 333–368). Washington, DC: Maisonneuve Press.Google Scholar
  4. Butler, J. (2010). Introduction. In J. T. Sanders & K. Terezakis (Eds.), György Lukács, Soul and Form (pp. 1–15) (A. Bostock, Trans.). New York: Columbia UP.Google Scholar
  5. Jameson, F. (1971). Marxism and Form: Twentieth-Century Dialectical Theories of Literature. Princeton, NJ: Princeton UP.Google Scholar
  6. Jameson, F. (1975). Beyond the Cave: Demystifying the Ideology of Modernism. In The Ideologies of Theory (pp. 415–433). New York: Verso, 2008.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Jameson, F. (1976). The Ideology of the Text. In The Ideologies of Theory (pp. 20–76). New York: Verso, 2008.Google Scholar
  8. Jameson, F. (1977). Reflections on the Brecht-Lukács Debate. In The Ideologies of Theory (pp. 434–450). New York: Verso, 2008.Google Scholar
  9. Jameson, F. (1988). Cognitive Mapping. In C. Nelson & L. Grossberg (Eds.), Marxism and the Interpretation of Culture (pp. 347–360). Chicago: University of Illinois Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Jameson, F. (1991). Postmodernism, or, The Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism. New York: Verso.Google Scholar
  11. Jameson, F. (1992). Signatures of the Visible. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  12. Laclau, E., & Mouffe, C. (2001). Hegemony and Socialist Strategy: Towards a Radical Democratic Politics (2nd ed.). London and New York: Verso.Google Scholar
  13. Lee, Y. S. (2011). Temporalized Invariance: Lukács and the Work of Form. In T. Bewes & T. Hall (Eds.), Georg Lukács: The Fundamental Dissonance of Existence (pp. 17–35). London and New York: Bloomsbury.Google Scholar
  14. Lukács, G. (1971). The Theory of the Novel: A Historico-Philosophical Essay on the Forms of Great Epic Literature (A. Bostock, Trans.). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  15. Lukács, G. (1978). Writer and Critic (A. Kahn, Ed. & Trans.). London: Merlin Press.Google Scholar
  16. Lukács, G. (1994). Die Theorie des Romans: Ein geschichtsphilosophischer Versuch über die Formen der großen Epik. Munich: DTV.Google Scholar
  17. Lukács, G. (2002). Studies in European Realism: Balzac, Stendhal, Tolstoy, Zola, Gorky (E. Bone, Trans.). New York: Howard Fertig.Google Scholar
  18. Lukács, G. (2006). The Meaning of Contemporary Realism (John & N. Mander, Trans.). London: Merlin Press.Google Scholar
  19. Lukács, G. (2007). Realism in the Balance (R. Livingstone, Trans.). In T. W. Adorno et al., Aesthetics and Politics (pp. 28–59). London and New York: Verso, 2007 [1977].Google Scholar
  20. Lukács, G. (2010). Soul and Form (J. T. Sanders & K. Terezakis, Ed.; A. Bostock, Trans.). New York: Columbia UP.Google Scholar
  21. Lukács, G. (2011). History and Class Consciousness: Studies in Marxist Dialectics (R. Livingstone, Trans.). London: Merlin Press.Google Scholar
  22. Nietzsche, F. (1974). The Gay Science (W. Kaufmann, Trans.). New York: Vintage.Google Scholar
  23. Rorty, R. (1999). Philosophy and Social Hope. New York: Penguin.Google Scholar
  24. Rorty, R. (2004). Philosophy as a Transitional Genre. In S. Benhabib & N. Fraser (Eds.), Pragmatism, Critique, Judgment: Essays for Richard J. Bernstein (pp. 3–28). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  25. Rorty, R. (2010). Redemption from Egotism: James and Proust as Spiritual Exercises. In C. J. Voparil & R. J. Bernstein (Eds.), The Rorty Reader (pp. 389–406). Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.Google Scholar
  26. Rorty, R. (2011). An Ethics for Today: Finding Common Ground Between Philosophy and Religion. New York: Columbia UP.Google Scholar
  27. Thompson, M. J. (2011). Ontology and Totality: Reconstructing Lukács’ Concept of Critical Theory. In M. J. Thompson (Ed.), Georg Lukács Reconsidered: Critical Essays in Politics, Philosophy, and Aesthetics (pp. 229–250). London and New York: Bloomsbury.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ulf Schulenberg
    • 1
  1. 1.University of BremenBremenGermany

Personalised recommendations