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Augmented Reality Gamification for Human Anatomy

  • Antonina Argo
  • Marco ArrigoEmail author
  • Fabio Bucchieri
  • Francesco Cappello
  • Francesco Di Paola
  • Mariella Farella
  • Alberto Fucarino
  • Antonietta Lanzarone
  • Giosuè Lo Bosco
  • Dario Saguto
  • Federico Sannasardo
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 11385)

Abstract

This paper focuses on the use of Augmented Reality technologies in relation to the introduction of game design elements to support university medical students in their learning activities during a human anatomy laboratory. In particular, the solution we propose will provide educational contents visually connected to the physical organ, giving also the opportunity to handle a 3D physical model that is a perfect reproduction of a real human organ.

Keywords

Augmented Reality Gamification Mobile learning Medicine Human anatomy  

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Antonina Argo
    • 1
  • Marco Arrigo
    • 2
    Email author
  • Fabio Bucchieri
    • 3
  • Francesco Cappello
    • 3
  • Francesco Di Paola
    • 4
  • Mariella Farella
    • 2
  • Alberto Fucarino
    • 3
  • Antonietta Lanzarone
    • 1
  • Giosuè Lo Bosco
    • 5
    • 6
  • Dario Saguto
    • 3
  • Federico Sannasardo
    • 5
  1. 1.Department Pro.SAMI - Forensic MedicineUniversity of PalermoPalermoItaly
  2. 2.Institute for Educational TechnologiesItalian National Research CouncilPalermoItaly
  3. 3.Department of Experimental Biomedicine and Clinical NeuroscienceUniversity of PalermoPalermoItaly
  4. 4.Department of ArchitectureUniversity of PalermoPalermoItaly
  5. 5.Department of Mathematics and Computer ScienceUniversity of PalermoPalermoItaly
  6. 6.Department SITEuro-Mediterranean Institute of Science and TechnologyPalermoItaly

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