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A Hard Day’s Night: Provision of Public Evening Schools in the United States, 1870–1910

  • Linda EnglishEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Studies in Public Choice book series (SIPC, volume 39)

Abstract

In the United States, enrollment in public evening schools increased throughout the nineteenth century. The expansion of evening schools was far from uniform across space, however, with some cities embracing this form of education much more readily than others. This paper brings together information from the Census, Annual Reports of the U.S. Commissioner of Education, states’ school superintendent’s reports and factory inspection reports, and various secondary sources to examine the diffusion of public evening schools in the U.S. Although proponents of evening schools often cited the welfare of working children as the primary rationale for providing this type of education alternative, the econometric evidence suggests that the political economy of evening school provision hinged more on school boards’ responsiveness to differences in immigration levels and school overcrowding than exogenous differences in the proportion of children working.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Baylor UniversityWacoUSA

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