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Conclusion

  • Angela D. Nichols
Chapter
Part of the Human Rights Interventions book series (HURIIN)

Abstract

Though a subset of the variety of transitional justice mechanisms from which post-conflict and post-authoritarian countries select, truth commissions are a diverse set of bodies. Throughout this book, I argue that certain characteristics are associated with legitimacy and therefore contribute to better outcomes regarding human rights and violence in the societies where they exist. Based on my analysis, the authority of a truth commission is the most consistently tied to positive outcomes. This chapter summarizes the findings and implications of the project before concluding with an analysis of The Commission for the Clarification of Truth, Coexistence, and Non-Repetition in Colombia.

Keywords

Transitional justice Truth commission Colombia Human rights Violence 

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Angela D. Nichols
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Political ScienceFlorida Atlantic UniversityBoca RatonUSA

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