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LEDs and New Technologies for Circadian Lighting

  • Maurizio RossiEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Research for Development book series (REDE)

Abstract

In order to implement artificial circadian lighting in interior spaces, to compensate for the lack of natural light, one must take into account the light requirements of human beings and therefore the technologies that makes it possible to meet them. In this chapter, we present the latest lighting technologies that can facilitate the circadian lighting design. A first part introduces the types of LEDs currently available on the market, analysing the main positive and negative aspects of the different technological solutions. The following part focuses on sensors and light management systems that make it possible to receive information on the amount of light and the presence and position of people in interiors. This information must be managed by smart lighting control systems, which are presented both from a theoretical and an applicative standpoint. The study also focuses on the regulatory aspects of lighting products, with reference to energy saving. Lastly, we introduce some smart lighting solutions aimed at integrating into the new “smart home” concept.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Laboratorio Luce, Department of DesignPolitecnico di MilanoMilanItaly

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