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7 Demography of Childhood

  • Yeris H. Mayol-GarciaEmail author
  • William P. O’Hare
Chapter
Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the demography of children. We first examine the subject in the context of the United States, followed by an international lens. Included in our chapter are statistics and discussions regarding child populations, as well as, child-related demographic elements such as fertility, mortality and migration. We also provide trends on critical socio-demographic factors that interact to shape the lives of children, including families, education, and child poverty. Although the main focus of this chapter is on children defined as the population from birth through age 17, differences in life experiences for young kids and adolescents are also discussed. Some geographic and regional trends are also presented. Additionally, we consider the organizational infrastructure for the worldwide collection of demographic data on children, as well as, the expansion of projects designed to provide indicators of child well-being.

Keywords

Children United States World Child well-being Demography Fertility Mortality Migration Family Education Child poverty Data 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.U.S. Census BureauSuitlandUSA
  2. 2.O’Hare Data and Demographic Services LLCCape CharlesUSA

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