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Selecting Effective Blockchain Solutions

  • Carsten Maple
  • Jack Jackson
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 11339)

Abstract

Distributed ledger technologies (DLT) are becoming increasingly popular and seen as a panacea for a wide range of applications. However, it is clear that many organisations, and even engineers, are selecting DLT solutions without fully understanding their power or limitations. Those that make the assessment that blockchain is the best solution are provided little guidance on the vast array of types of blockchain; whether permissioned, permissionless or federated; which consensus algorithm to use; and a range of other considerations. This paper aims to addresses this gap.

Keywords

Distributed ledger technology Blockchain anatomy Blockchain selection Consensus determination protocol 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of WarwickCoventryUK
  2. 2.EverledgerLondonUK

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