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Recycling in Supply Chains for Tomorrow’s Low-Carbon Industries

  • Adam C. PowellEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the The Minerals, Metals & Materials Series book series (MMMS)

Abstract

Metal production and recycling technology changes are urgently needed to confront multiple simultaneous grand challenges in society. Energy production and distribution and transportation are undergoing disruptive transformations, and industry will follow. Unlike prior disruptions, such as the Internet and biotech, this will up-end material and energy flows around the planet. Due to both heightened awareness of climate impacts and plunging costs of sustainable technology, fossil energy and metals technologies which took 250 years to reach planet-wide industrial ubiquity must be swept aside and replaced in 2–3 decades. This talk will present energy industry scenarios and discuss new supply chains which will need to emerge in order to support these scenarios, the role which recycling must play in order to make these new supply chains themselves sustainable, and the timescales in which these changes need to happen, in order to meet targets for preventing large-scale climate disruption.

Keywords

Recycling Greenhouse emissions Solar Wind Electric vehicles 

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Copyright information

© The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Worcester Polytechnic InstituteWorcesterUSA

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