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Global Political Economy and Regionalization: Four Paradigmatic Views

  • Kavous ArdalanEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Any explanation of regionalization is based on a worldview. The premise of this book is that any worldview can be associated with one of the four broad paradigms: functionalist, interpretive, radical humanist, and radical structuralist. This chapter takes the case of regionalization and discusses it from the four different viewpoints. It emphasizes that the four views expressed are equally scientific and informative; they look at the phenomenon from their certain paradigmatic viewpoint; and together they provide a more balanced understanding of the phenomenon under consideration.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of ManagementMarist CollegePoughkeepsieUSA

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