Advertisement

Global Political Economy and the Driving Force of Globalization: Four Paradigmatic Views

  • Kavous ArdalanEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Any explanation of the driving force of globalization is based on a worldview. The premise of this book is that any worldview can be associated with one of the four broad paradigms: functionalist, interpretive, radical humanist, and radical structuralist. This chapter takes the case of the driving force of globalization and discusses it from the four different viewpoints. It emphasizes that the four views expressed are equally scientific and informative; they look at the phenomenon from their certain paradigmatic viewpoint; and together they provide a more balanced understanding of the phenomenon under consideration.

References

  1. Archibugi, Daniele, and Andrea Filippetti (eds.). 2015. The handbook of global science, technology, and innovation. Chichester, Sussex, Britain: Wiley.Google Scholar
  2. Alamuti, Mohamadi Masoud. 2015. Critical Rationalism and Globalization: Towards the Sociology of the Open Global. New York, NY, USA: Routledge Society.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Baran, Paul A. 1957. The Political Economy Of Growth. New York, NY, USA: Monthly Review Press.Google Scholar
  4. Baran, Paul A., and Paul M. Sweezy. 1966. Monopoly Capital. New York, NY, USA: Monthly Review Press.Google Scholar
  5. Bell, Daniel. 1960. The End of Ideology: On the Exhaustion of Political Ideas in the Fifties. Glencoe, Illinois, U.S.A: Free Press.Google Scholar
  6. Boyer, Robert, and Daniel Drache (eds.). 1996. States Against Markets: The Limits of Globalization. New York, NY, USA: Routledge.Google Scholar
  7. Chabal, Patrick. 2012. The End of Conceit: Western Rationality after Postcolonialism. New York, NY, USA: Zed Books.Google Scholar
  8. Cohn, Theodore H. 2005. Global Political Economy: Theory and Practice. New York, NY, USA: Pearson Education Inc, Longman.Google Scholar
  9. Cox, R.W. 1986, Social Forces, States and World Orders: Beyond International Relations Theory. In Neoliberalism and Its Critics, ed. Robert O. Keohane, 204–254. New York, NY, USA: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  10. Cox, Robert W. 1987. Production, Power, and World Order: Social Forces in the Making of History. New York, NY, USA: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  11. Cox, Robert W. 1996. A Perspective on Globalization. In Globalization: Critical Reflections, ed. James H. Mittelman, 21–30. Boulder, Colorado, USA: Lynne: Rienner Publishers.Google Scholar
  12. Cox, R.W. 1999. Civil Society at the Turn of the Millennium: Prospects for an Alternative World Order. Review of International Studies 25: 3.Google Scholar
  13. Currie, J.K., and J. Newson (eds.). 1998. Universities and Globalization: Critical Perspectives, Thousand Oaks, California, USA: Sage Publications, Inc.Google Scholar
  14. Duina, Francesco. 2006. The Social Construction of Free Trade: The European Union, NAFTA, and MERCOSUR. Princeton, New Jersey, USA: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  15. Foster, John Bellamy, and Robert W. McChesney. 2004. Pox Americana: Exposing the American. Empire, New York, NY, USA: Monthly Review Press.Google Scholar
  16. Frank, A.G., 1990. A Theoretical Introduction to 5,000 Years of World-System History. Review 13(2):155–248.Google Scholar
  17. Frank, Andre Gunder. 1998. ReORIENT: Global Economy in the Asian Age. Berkeley, California, USA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  18. Friedman, Milton. 1962. Capitalism and Freedom. Chicago, Illinois, USA: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  19. Friedman, Milton, and Rose Friedman. 1980. Free to Choose: A Personal Statement. New York, NY, USA: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.Google Scholar
  20. Friedman, Thomas L. 2007. The World Is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-First Century. New York, NY, USA: Picador.Google Scholar
  21. Fukuyama, Francis. 1989. The End of History?, National Interest. Summer 16: 3–18.Google Scholar
  22. Fukuyama, F. 1991. Liberal Democracy as a Global Phenomenon. PS: Political Science and Politics, 24(4): 659–664.Google Scholar
  23. Fukuyama, Francis. 1992. The End of History and the Last Man. New York, NY, USA: Free Press.Google Scholar
  24. Fukuyama, Francis. 1995. Reflections on the End of History, Five Years Later. History and Theory 34 (2): 27–43.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Fukuyama, Francis, 1999. Second Thoughts: The Last Man in a Bottle. National Interest, 56, Summer, 16–44.Google Scholar
  26. Gill, Stephen (ed.). 1993. Gramsci Historical Materialism and International Relations. Cambridge, Britain: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  27. Gill, Stephen. 1995. Globalization, Market Civilisation, and Disciplinary Neoliberalism. Millennium: Journal of International Studies 24 (3): 399–423.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Gilpin, Robert G. 1975. US Power and the Multinational Corporation: The Political Economy of Foreign Direct Investment. New York, NY, USA: Basic Books.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Gilpin, Robert G. 1981. War and Change in World Politics. Cambridge, Britain: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Gilpin, R.G., 1984. The Richness of the Tradition of Political Realism. International Organization, 38:2, Spring.Google Scholar
  31. Gilpin, Robert G. 1987. The Political Economy of International Relations. Princeton, New Jersey, USA: Princeton University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Gilpin, Robert G. 2000. The Challenge of Global Capitalism: The World Economy in the 21st Century. Princeton, New Jersey, USA: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  33. Gilpin, Robert G. 2001. Global Political. Economy, Princeton, New Jersey, USA: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  34. Gramsci, Antonio, 1971. Selections from the Prison Notebooks. Trans. and ed. Quintin Hoare and Geoffrey Nowell Smith. New York, NY, USA: International Publishers.Google Scholar
  35. Gray, John. 1998. False Dawn: The Delusions of Global Capitalism. New York, NY, USA: New Press.Google Scholar
  36. Hamilton, A. 1966. The Report on the Subject of Manufactures. December 5, 1791, In Harold C. Syrett, (ed.), The Papers of Alexander Hamilton, Vol. 10, New York, NY, USA: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  37. Hayek, Friedrich A. 1978. New Studies in Philosophy, Politics, Economics and the History of ideas. Chicago, Illinois, USA: University of Chicago Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Held, D. 1991. Democracy, the Nation and the Global System. Economy and Society, 20(2):138–172.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Held, David. 1995a. Democracy and the Global Order: From the Modern State to Cosmopolitan Governance. Cambridge, Britain: Polity Press.Google Scholar
  40. Held, David. 1995b. Democracy and the New International Order. In Cosmopolitan Democracy: An Agenda for a New World Order, ed. Daniele Archibugi and David Held, 96–120. Cambridge, Britain: Polity Press.Google Scholar
  41. Held, David and McGrew, Anthony, 1993, “Globalization and the Liberal Democratic State,” Government and Opposition, 28:2, Spring, 261–285.Google Scholar
  42. Held, David, and Anthony McGrew. 2002a. Globalization/Anti-Globalization. Cambridge, Britain: Polity Press.Google Scholar
  43. Held, D., and A. McGrew (eds.). 2002b. The Global Transformation Reader: An Introduction to the Globalization Debate, 2nd ed, Cambridge, Britain: Polity Press.Google Scholar
  44. Held, David, Anthony McGrew, David Goldblatt, and Jonathan Perraton. 1999. Global Transformations: Politics, Economics and Culture. Stanford, California, USA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  45. Higgins, Vaughan, and Geoffrey Lawrence (eds.). 2005. Agricultural Governance: Globalization and the New Politics of Regulation. New York, NY, USA: Routledge.Google Scholar
  46. Hirst, P. 1997. The Global Economy: Myths and Realities. International Affairs 73(3): 409–425.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Hirst, P., and Thompson, G. 1996. Globalization: Ten Frequently Asked Questions and Some Surprising Answers, Soundings, 2, Autumn, 47–66.Google Scholar
  48. Hirst, Paul, and Graham Thompson. 2000. Globalization in Question: The International Economy and the Possibilities of Governance. Cambridge, Britain: Polity Press.Google Scholar
  49. Hobson, J.A. 1975. Imperialism, New York, NY, USA: Gordon Press.Google Scholar
  50. Jameson, Fredric, and Masao Miyoshi. 1998. The Cultures of Globalization. Durham, North Carolina, USA: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  51. Johnson, Steven. 2015. How We Go to Now: Six Innovations that Made the Modern World. New York, NY, USA: Riverhead Books.Google Scholar
  52. Kellner, D. 2002. Theorizing Globalization. Sociological Theory, 20(3):285–305.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  53. Krasner, Stephen D. 1978. Defending the National Interest: Raw Materials Investment and US Foreign Policy. Princeton, New Jersey, USA: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  54. Krasner, Stephen D. 1993. Economic Interdependence and Independent Statehood. In State in a Changing World: A Contemporary Analysis, ed. R.H. Jackson and A. James. Oxford, Britain: Clarendon.Google Scholar
  55. Krasner, Stephen D. 1999. Sovereignty: Organized Hypocrisy. Princeton, New Jersey, USA: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  56. Lenin, V.I. 1939. Imperialism: The Highest Stage of Capitalism. New York, NY, USA: International Publishers.Google Scholar
  57. List, Friedrich. 1916. The National System of Political Economy, translated by Sampson S. Lloyd, London, Britain: Longmans, Green.Google Scholar
  58. Locke, John. 1964. Two Treatises of Government. Cambridge, Britain: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  59. Loewenstein, Antony. 2015. Disaster Capitalism: Making a Killing Out of Catastrophe. New York, NY, USA: Verso.Google Scholar
  60. Magdoff, H. 1969. The Age of Imperialism, New York, NY, USA.: Monthly Review Press.Google Scholar
  61. Magdoff, H. 1992. Globalization—to What End? In R. Miliband and L. Panitch, (eds.), Socialist Register, pp. 44–75. London, Britain: Merlin.Google Scholar
  62. Misa, T.J. 2011. Leonardo to the Internet: Technology and Culture from the Renaissance to the Present, Baltimore, Maryland, USA: Johns Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
  63. Mises, L. 1974. Planning for Freedom, South Holland, Illinois, USA: Libertarian Press.Google Scholar
  64. Mittelman, James. 1996. The Dynamics of Globalization. In Globalization: Critical Reflections, ed. James H. Mittelman, 1–19. Boulder, Colorado, USA: Lynne: Rienner Publishers.Google Scholar
  65. Mittelman, J.H. 2000. The Globalization Syndrome: Transformation and Resistance, Princeton, New Jersey, USA: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  66. Naisbitt, John. 1995. Global Paradox: The Bigger the World Economy, the More Powerful Its Smallest Players. London, Britain: Nicholas Brealey Publishing.Google Scholar
  67. Narula, Rajneesh. 2003. Globalization and Technology: Interdependence. Innovation Systems and Industrial Policy, Cambridge, Britain: Polity Press.Google Scholar
  68. Ohmae, K. 1990. The Borderless World: Power and Strategy in the Interlinked World Economy, New York, NY, USA: Harper Business, a division of HarperCollins Publishers.Google Scholar
  69. Ohmae, Kenichi. 1995. The End of the Nation-State: The Rise of Regional Economics. New York, NY, USA: Free Press.Google Scholar
  70. Radice, Hugo, 1999, “Taking Globalization Seriously,” in Panitch, Leo and Leys, Colin, (eds.), Global Capitalism versus Democracy: Socialist Register 1999, 1–28. New York, NY, U.S.A.: Monthly Review Press.Google Scholar
  71. Ricardo, D. 1963. The Principles of Political Economy and Taxation, Homewood, Illinois, USA: Irwin.Google Scholar
  72. Robinson, William I. 2008. Latin America and Global Capitalism: A Critical Perspective. Baltimore, Maryland, USA: Johns Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
  73. Roy, Arundhati. 2014. Capitalism: A Ghost Story. Chicago, Illinois, USA: Haymarket Books.Google Scholar
  74. Scholte, J.A. 1997. Global Capitalism and the State. International Affairs, 73(3):427–452.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  75. Scholte, Jan Aart. 2005. Globalization: A Critical Introduction. New York, NY, USA: St. Martin’s Press Inc.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  76. Singer, Daniel. 1999. Whose Millennium? Theirs or Ours?. New York, NY, USA: Monthly Review Press.Google Scholar
  77. Sjolander, Claire Turenne. 1996. The Rhetoric of Globalization: What’s in a wor(l)d? International Journal 51 (4): 603–616.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  78. Skocpol, Theda. 1985. Bringing the State Back. In Strategies of Analysis in Current Research, ed. Peter E. Evans, Dietrich Rueschemeyer, and Theda Skocpol. Bringing the State Back In, Cambridge, Britain: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  79. Smith, Adam. 1910. The Wealth of Nations. London, Britain: Dent & Sons, Everyman’s Library.Google Scholar
  80. Smith, John. 2016. Imperialism in the Twenty-First Century: Globalization, Super-Exploitation, and Capitalism’s Final Crisis. New York, NY, USA: Monthly Review Press.Google Scholar
  81. Spencer, H. 1972. On Social Evolution, J.D.Y. Peel (Ed.), Chicago, Illinois, USA: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  82. Steger, Manfred B. 2002. Globalism: The New Market Ideology. New York, NY, USA: Rowan & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.Google Scholar
  83. Steger, Manfred B. 2003. Globalization: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford, Britain: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  84. Subramanian, Ramesh, and Eddan Katz (eds.). 2011. The Global Flow of Information: Legal, Social, and Cultural Perspectives. New York, NY, USA: New York University Press.Google Scholar
  85. Sweezy, Paul Marlor. 1942. The Theory of Capitalist Development. New York, NY, USA: Monthly Review Press.Google Scholar
  86. Thomas, C. 1997. Globalization and the South. In Thomas, Caroline and Wilkin, Peter, (eds.), 1997. Globalization and the South, 1–17. New York, NY, USA: St. Martin’s Press.Google Scholar
  87. Veseth, Michael. 1998. Selling Globalization: The Myth of the Global Economy. Boulder, Colorado, USA: Lynne Rienner Publishers.Google Scholar
  88. Wallerstein, E. 1974. The Modern World-System, vol. 2, London, Britain: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  89. Wallerstein, Emmanuel. 1979. The Capitalist World Economy. Cambridge, Britain: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  90. Wallerstein, Emmanuel. 1984. The Politics of the World-Economy. Cambridge, Britain: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  91. Waltz, Kenneth N. 1970. The Myth of National Interdependence. In The International Corporation, ed. Charles P. Kindleberger. Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  92. Waltz, Kenneth N. 1979. Theory of International Politics. Reading, Britain: Addison-Wesley.Google Scholar
  93. Weiss, Linda. 1998. The Myth of the Powerless State: Governing the Economy in a Global Era. Ithaca, New York, USA: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
  94. Weiss, Linda (ed.). 2003. States in the Global Economy: Bringing Domestic Institutions Back In. Cambridge, Britain: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  95. Wriston, Walter B. 1992. The Twilight of Sovereignty: How the Information Revolution is Transforming Our World. New York, NY, USA: Charles Scribner’s Sons.Google Scholar
  96. Zysman, John. 1996. The Myth of a ‘Global’ Economy: Enduring National Foundations and Emerging Regional Realities. New Political Economy 1 (2): 157–184.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of ManagementMarist CollegePoughkeepsieUSA

Personalised recommendations