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Emergencies Related to Advanced Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

  • Riccardo Memeo
  • Alessandro Verbo
  • Patrick Pessaux
  • Emanuele Felli
Chapter
Part of the Hot Topics in Acute Care Surgery and Trauma book series (HTACST)

Abstract

Metastatic liver cancer is often associated with complications associed with the progression of the pathology. The menagement of such complication is problematic, considering the fragility ot the patient. This chapter want to clearify the management of this life-threatening complications.

Keywords

Complications Metastatic liver cancer Management 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Riccardo Memeo
    • 1
  • Alessandro Verbo
    • 2
  • Patrick Pessaux
    • 3
  • Emanuele Felli
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation, Institute of General Surgery and Liver TransplantationUniversity of BariBariItaly
  2. 2.Hepato-Biliary and Pancreatic Surgical Unit, Miulli HospitalBariItaly
  3. 3.Hepato-Biliary and Pancreatic Surgical Unit, General, Digestive, and Endocrine Surgery, IRCAD, Strasbourg’s IHU (Institute for Minimally Invasive Image-Guided Surgery)University of StrasbourgStrasbourgFrance

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