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The Drivers of ODA: What Can They Tell About the Future?

  • Olav StokkeEmail author
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Part of the EADI Global Development Series book series (EADI)

Abstract

Part Four responds to the research questions posed (Chap.  1), including the major one: what are the main drivers of development assistance and what explains the extensive variation in the performances of individual countries? It starts (Section 1) by addressing one potential driver that almost disappeared under the radar with the countries selected for scrutiny: the impact of the colonial past on their aid policy. The main conclusion: there is no one policy driver but many, varying from one aid-providing country to another, and over time from one government to the next. Nevertheless, countries basing their policy mainly on ideal domestic societal values (solidarity, humanity), and mainly pursuing international common goods rather than self-serving interests, score highest in relative terms as ODA providers.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Norwegian Institute of International AffairsOsloNorway

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