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A Hub for Africa? The Information and Communications Technology Sector in Cape Town

  • John Stuart
Chapter
Part of the Advances in African Economic, Social and Political Development book series (AAESPD)

Abstract

The larger metropolitan area of Cape Town is a hub for services in information and communications technology (ICT). Considering the development opportunities related to this sector, this chapter explores the nature and dimensions of the South African ICT sector and within it, the one in Cape Town. Based on desk studies, including a detailed assessment of statistical information and an in-depth analysis of four firms, the author analyses how the South African ICT sector integrates into value chains on various geographical scales. He also sheds light on the challenges that Cape Townian ICT firms face in expanding their operations—access to finance and markets, for example—and suggests that there is much potential for these firms in expanding into Africa at large.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research presented here benefitted from funding by the United States Agency for International Development, provided via the Trade Law Centre in Stellenbosch. The author would like to thank Sören Scholvin for commenting on draft versions of this chapter.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Stuart
    • 1
  1. 1.Trade Law CentreStellenboschSouth Africa

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