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Assessing the Ability of Image Processing Methods of Droplets Sprayed on Water Sensitive Papers for Aerial Application

  • Gang Xu
  • Ruirui ZhangEmail author
  • Liping Chen
  • Qing Tang
  • Min Xu
  • Wanmin Zhang
Conference paper
Part of the IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology book series (IFIPAICT, volume 509)

Abstract

In this study, 33 pieces of WSP were placed along three lines in a paddy. An M-18B Dromader AG aircraft flew and sprayed over the field, and the spray deposits were collected by water sensitive paper. Seven greyscale parameters were used to compare the color depth, deviation and homogeneity of digital water sensitive images. The greyscale images were converted to binary images with five threshold selection methods. The results of recognition of seven greyscale parameters and five threshold methods were compared to analyze the droplets in different scanned images on water sensitive paper. The effects of the threshold on the computation of deposit density and the stain size were evaluated. The most suitable grey scale was found to be luminosity. Finally, a manual validation was performed, and the relationship between the threshold and the stain size of was analyzed.

Keywords

WSP Image analysis Aerial application Droplet identification 

Notes

Acknowledgment

Funds for this research was provided by The National Key Research and Development Program of China (2017YFD0701004), National Natural Science Fund for Distinguished Young Scholars (31601228) and the 2016 fund from Beijing Academy of Agriculture and Forestry sciences for young scientists (QNJJ201632).

The experiment is corporate with Beidahuang General Aviation. The pilots and engineer was extremely helpful in providing information and implementations of our experiment.

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Copyright information

© IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gang Xu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ruirui Zhang
    • 2
    Email author
  • Liping Chen
    • 2
  • Qing Tang
    • 2
  • Min Xu
    • 2
  • Wanmin Zhang
    • 3
  1. 1.College of EngineeringChina Agricultural UniversityBeijingChina
  2. 2.National Research Center of Intelligent Equipment for AgricultureBeijing Academy of Agricultural and Forestry SciencesBeijingChina
  3. 3.Plant Protection Station of Liaoning ProvinceShengyangChina

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