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The Significance of Mission Groups for the Structure of English Higher Education and the Demise of the 1994 Group

  • Ourania FilippakouEmail author
  • Ted Tapper
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Education book series (BRIEFSEDUCAT)

Abstract

The emergence of mission groups in UK higher education is a clear manifestation of the fragmentation of the overall structure of the system. The groups enable particular universities to present their self-identities and to ally with parallel institutions to advocate common policy positions. The membership of the 1994 Group which saw itself as representing the smaller, research intensive universities was composed mainly of the 1960s new universities, although both the Universities of Warwick and York deserted it to join the Russell Group, which sees itself as representing the major British research universities. Interestingly, there was no attempt on the part of the 1994 Group to reformulate itself around the idea of the need to reformulate teaching and learning in UK higher education, which we take as an important indication of the demise of the idea of the new university.

Keywords

Mission group splits Mission group identities 1994 Group collapse 

References

  1. Filippakou, O., Salter, B., & Tapper, T. (2012a). Higher education as a system: The english experience. Higher Education Quarterly, 66(1), 106–122.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Filippakou, O., Salter, B., & Tapper, T. (2012b). The changing structure of British higher education: How diverse is it? Tertiary Education and Management, 18(4), 321–333.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of EducationBrunel University LondonUxbridgeUK
  2. 2.Oxford Centre for Higher Education Policy Studies (OxCheps)New College, OxfordOxfordUK

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