Advertisement

The Myth of the Happy Hooker: Kantian Moral Reflections on a Phenomenology of Prostitution

  • Clelia SmythEmail author
  • Yolanda Estes
Chapter
Part of the Library of Public Policy and Public Administration book series (LPPP, volume 12)

Abstract

This essay represents an attempt to bring prostitutes’ and clients’ voices into the philosophical discourse about prostitution. We wish to add the voices of individual prostitutes and clients in order to expand the contemporary philosophical understanding of prostitution as a complex and problematic ethical concern. The first section of this essay explains the concepts of subjectivity, sexuality, and violence that underpin our analysis of prostitution. The second section scrutinizes the prostitute’s and client’s motivating goals and the means they use to accomplish them. The third, and final, section presents a phenomenological description of prostituted sex from the prostitute’s and client’s respective viewpoints.

References

  1. Kant, Immanuel. 1964. Groundwork on the metaphysics of morals. Scranton: HarperCollins.Google Scholar
  2. Lemoncheck, Linda. 1994. What’s wrong with being a sex object? In Living with contradictions: Controversies in feminist social ethics, ed. Alison M. Jaggar. Boulder: Westview.Google Scholar
  3. Mill, John Stuart. 1970. The subjection of women. In Essays on sex equality, ed. A.S. Rossi. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Pateman, Carole. 1994. What’s wrong with prostitution? In Living with contradictions: Controversies in feminist social ethics, ed. Alison M. Jaggar. Boulder: Westview.Google Scholar
  5. Peterson, James R. 1995. The rules of the game, Playboy, October. Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of EducationUniversity of KentuckyLexingtonUSA
  2. 2.Mississippi State University (retired)StarkvilleUSA

Personalised recommendations