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Emission Profile of PM10 and PM2.5 in Iron Ore Sintering Process and Control Technology

  • Zhiyun JiEmail author
  • Xiaohui Fan
  • Min Gan
  • Xuling Chen
  • Wei Lv
  • Guojing Wong
  • Tao Jiang
Conference paper
Part of the The Minerals, Metals & Materials Series book series (MMMS)

Abstract

Controlling the emission of ultra-fine particulate matters (PM10 and PM2.5) in sintering process is significant for green iron & steel manufacturing. In this investigation, the emission profile and control technique of PM10 and PM2.5 during sintering process were studied. PM10 and PM2.5 characterized high emission concentration in special sintering areas, which were sintering stage-4 to stage-6, and sintering stage-4 to stage-5, respectively. The emission load of PM10 and PM2.5 in special areas accounted for about 63.5 and 47.0% of the total, respectively. Based on these properties, spraying organic binder solution on granules during granulation process was found to improve the absorption efficiency of sintering bed to PM10 and PM2.5, which made them intensively emitted within sintering stage-5 and stage-6, with accounting for 74.8 and 74.2% of the total. The research findings were helpful to realize the efficient and economic control of PM10 and PM2.5 in practical sintering plants.

Keywords

Iron ore sintering PM10 and PM2.5 Emission profile Efficient control 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51804347, Fund No. U1660206), and Hunan Provincial Co-Innovation Center for Clean and Efficient Utilization of Strategic Metal Mineral Resources.

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Copyright information

© The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zhiyun Ji
    • 1
    Email author
  • Xiaohui Fan
    • 1
  • Min Gan
    • 1
  • Xuling Chen
    • 1
  • Wei Lv
    • 1
  • Guojing Wong
    • 1
  • Tao Jiang
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Minerals Processing & BioengineeringCentral South UniversityChangshaPeople’s Republic of China

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