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Three Strategic Languages: Russian, Korean and Arabic

  • Jennifer Joan Baldwin
Chapter
Part of the Language Policy book series (LAPO, volume 17)

Abstract

Three more languages are considered in detail in this chapter. Each has had, and still, has strategic significance for Australia. Each of these areas which these languages represent, Russia, Korea and the Middle East have been areas where Australian defence personnel have served in both World Wars, the Korean War and in subsequent conflicts in the Middle East. Russian language has been a language of many migrant waves, but also a literary language and a language of the “Cold War”. Australian involvement in the Korean War of the 1950s was followed by increasing trade with Korea and a priority for Korean language teaching prompted by the Federal Government. Arabic language teaching began in Australia in a scholarly context, then becoming a migrant language, and now as well, a language of strategic significance given ongoing conflicts in the Middle East. What these languages have in common is, in the case of Russian and Arabic, a lack of government interest and funding, and in the case of Korea, government funding but a lack of cachet in the tertiary language sphere.

Keywords

Strategic languages Defence concerns Trade languages Cold War Migrant languages 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jennifer Joan Baldwin
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of ArtsUniversity of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia

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