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Australia: Both Multicultural and Multilingual

  • Jennifer Joan Baldwin
Chapter
Part of the Language Policy book series (LAPO, volume 17)

Abstract

The title of this chapter, Australia both multicultural and multilingual, homes in on the issues facing Australia as a result of its huge post-war migration scheme. Not only did Australia become more multicultural demographically, but also consequently multilingual. As migrant communities became established in Australian society, they sought the right for their languages to be taught both in schools and universities. Government policies were changing: from the infamous White Australia policy formulated at Federation, to attitudes of assimilation and then integration. Changing governments tackled these issues calling for reports into migrant services, languages taught in the tertiary sector, how and why certain languages should be taught. Small community languages were vulnerable to funding cuts and variable student demand. Two case studies, one into Ukrainian and the other on Yiddish show the powerfulness of philanthropy in enabling community languages to continue.

Keywords

Multicultural Multilingual Community languages Migrant languages Galbally report Philanthropy 

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© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jennifer Joan Baldwin
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of ArtsUniversity of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia

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