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The Founding of Australian Universities

  • Jennifer Joan Baldwin
Chapter
Part of the Language Policy book series (LAPO, volume 17)

Abstract

In this chapter the history of the founding of Australian universities is explored. It looks at the key influences for such foundations, which overseas universities were seen as models and who were the key people involved. This began with the founding of the University of Sydney in 1850. Subsequently universities were founded in each colony, and in the case of Western Australia, in that state, after Federation. Given the diversity of the then colonies, later states, the distinctive influences and decisions about the need for each university are explored. The beginnings of languages teaching in each university is discussed as is the priorities for particular languages. The analysis also reveals that the quality and continuity of languages teaching in some institutions suffered due to staffing issues and financial constraints.

Keywords

University foundations Overseas influences British universities Australian colonies Classical languages Education for high office 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jennifer Joan Baldwin
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of ArtsUniversity of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia

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