Advertisement

Developing and Deploying FSW&P Through Standardization

  • Dwight A. BurfordEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the The Minerals, Metals & Materials Series book series (MMMS)

Abstract

Key advancements in friction stir welding and processing (FSW&P) have been chronicled in these biennial symposia. Insights gained through fundamental and applied research published in symposia proceedings hold significant value in maturing and furthering the development and deployment of FSW&P. However, not all of this research can be replicated scientifically to enable this purpose due to insufficient information provided in the published articles. Providing more complete process information in symposium papers will serve to advance broader acceptance of FSW&P by industry and regulatory agencies. This objective can be facilitated by including appropriate detail required by national and international standards in published research. Without such detail, the maturity of FSW&P will remain in question throughout the different industry sectors due to a lack of uniformity and consistency in published results. A study carried out in coordination with the Metallic Materials Properties Development and Standardization (MMPDS) handbook steering committee illustrates the value of such discipline. The study was undertaken to investigate the potential for developing design data for FSW. Also, because successful implementation of FSW&P is reliant upon understanding and controlling the local metalworking conditions around the weld tool (both thermally and mechanically), utilizing process feedback signals is needed to confirm the consistency and effectiveness, and thus the maturity, of these technologies to organizations and agencies charged with quality assurance.

Keywords

Welded aluminum alloys Friction stir welding (FSW) Friction stir processing (FSP) Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) Industry standards Specifications Process parameters and controls 

References

  1. 1.
    Friction stir welding and processing. In: 2001 TMS fall meeting, Indianapolis. Indiana, USA, 4–8 Nov 2001Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Friction stir welding & processing II. In: 2003 TMS Annual Meeting. San Diego, California, 2–6 March 2003Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Friction stir welding and processing III. In: 2005 TMS annual meeting. San Francisco, California, 13–17 Feb 2005Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Friction stir welding and processing IV. In: TMS 2007 annual meeting & exhibition. Orlando, Florida, USA, 25 Feb–1 March 2007Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Friction stir welding and processing V. In: TMS 2009 annual meeting & exhibition. San Francisco, California, USA, 15–19 Feb 2009Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Friction stir welding and processing VI. In: TMS 2011 annual meeting & exhibition. San Diego, California, USA, 27 Feb–3 March 2011Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Friction stir welding and processing VII. In: TMS 2013 annual meeting & exhibition. San Antonio, Texas, USA, 3–7 March 2013Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Friction stir welding and processing VIII. In: TMS 2015 144th annual meeting & exhibition. Orlando, Florida, USA, 15–19 March 2015Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Friction stir welding and processing IX. In: TMS 2017 146th annual meeting and exhibition. San Diego, California, 26 Feb–2 March 2017Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    AWS D17 Committee on Welding in the Aircraft and Aerospace Industry, AWS D17.3/D17.3M:2016, Specification for Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Applications, 2016 ed, The American Welding Society (AWS), Miami, Florida (2016)Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    AWS D1 Committee on Structural Welding, AWS D1.2/D1.2M:2014, Structural Welding Code–Aluminum, The American Welding Society, Miami, Florida (2014)Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    AWS C6 Committee on Friction Welding, AWS C6.3/C6.3M, Recommended Practices for Friction Stir Welding, New Ed, The American Welding Society, Miami, FloridaGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    AWS D8 Committee on Automotive Welding, AWS D8.17M, Specification for Automotive Weld Quality—Friction Stir Welding, New Ed, The American Welding Society, Miami, FloridaGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    IIW C-III-B-WGB1, Friction Stir Welding Standardisation Working Group, ISO 25239:2011, Friction stir welding—Aluminium, 2011 ed, vol 1, International Organization for Standardization (ISO), Geneva (2011)Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    IIW C-III-B-WGB4 Friction Stir Spot Welding Standardization Working Group, ISO/FDIS 18785, Friction stir spot welding—Aluminium, Geneva: International Organization for Standardization (ISO)Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Kallee SW, Nicholas ED, Thomas WM (2001) Industrialisation of friction stir welding for aerospace structures. In: Structures and technologies—challenges for future launchers. Strasbourg FranceGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Midling T, Kvale JS, Dahl O (1999) Industrialisation of the friction stir welding technology in panels production for the maritime sector. In: 1st international symposium on friction stir welding. Thousand Oaks, CA, USAGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    American Bureau of Shipping, ABS Guide for the Approval of Friction Stir Welding in Aluminum, 2011 Ed, American Bureau of Shipping, Houston, TXGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    NASA LBJ SC Materials and Processes Branch/ES4, Process Specification for Friction Stir Welding, NASA Ed, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, TXGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Arbegast WJ (2007) Friction stir welding: after a decade of development. In: TMS 2007 annual meeting & exhibition. Orlando, Florida, USAGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Nelson TW (2005) Friction stir welding: a brief review and perspective for the future. In: TMS 2005 annual meeting & exhibition. San Francisco, CA, USAGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Mahoney MW (2007) Chapter 5: mechanical properties of friction stir welded aluminum alloys, Mishra RS, Mahoney MW (eds), 1st edn, pp 71–110. ASM International, Metals Park, OhioGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Dos Santos J, Olea C, Coelho R, Kostka A, Paglia C, Ghidini T, Donne Eads C (2010) Chapter 11—metallurgy and weld performance in friction stir welding, Lohwasser D, Chen ZW (eds), 1st edn, pp 314–410. Woodhead Publishing, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    ISO Central Secretariat, “ISO,” International Organization for Standardization. https://www.iso.org/standard/69623.html. Accessed Oct 2018
  25. 25.
    Mishra R, Ma Z (2005) Friction stir welding and processing. Mater Sci Eng 50(1–2):1–78CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    Widener C, Tweedy B, Burford D (2007) Path independence of allowables. In: 7th AIAA aviation technology, integration and operations conference. Belfast, Northern Ireland, IrelandGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    Reynolds P, Tang W (2001) Alloy, tool, geometry, and process parameter effects on friction stir weld energies and resultant FSW joint propertie. In: Friction stir welding and processing. Indianapolis, Indiana, TMS Fall MeetingGoogle Scholar
  28. 28.
    Mahoney MW, Rhodes CG, Flintoff JG, Spurling RA, Bingel WH (1998) Properties of friction-stir-welded 7075 T651 aluminum. Mater Trans A 29A(7):1955–1964CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    Burford DA (2003) Friction stir welding of airframe structure: from one delivery system to another. SAE Trans 112(Section 1). J Aerosp 295–300Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    Burford DA (2003) SAE technical paper 2003-01-2897. In: Aerospace manufacturing technology conference & exposition, MontrealGoogle Scholar
  31. 31.
    MMPDS Coordination Committee, MMPDS Handbook, MMPDS-12 ed, Battelle Ed, Metallic Materials Properties Development and Standardization (MMPDS), Current, Columbus, OhioGoogle Scholar
  32. 32.
    Metallic Materials Properties Development and Standardization (MMPDS), Battelle, 505 King Ave, Columbus, Ohio 43201. https://www.mmpds.org/about-us/. Accessed Sept 2018
  33. 33.
    Burford D, Tweedy B, Widener C (2007) Evaluation of friction stir weld process and properties for aircraft application. Joint Advanced Materials & Structures Center of Excellence, Atlantic City, NJGoogle Scholar
  34. 34.
    Widener CA, Burford DA, Jurak S (2010) Effects of tool design and friction stir welding parameters on weld morphology in aluminum alloys. Mater Sci Forum 638–642:1261–1266CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. 35.
    Burford DA, Tweedy BM, Widener CA Development of design data for FSW and FSSW. In: 7th international symposium on friction stir welding. Awaji Island, Japan, 20–22 May 2008Google Scholar
  36. 36.
    Widener CA, Tweedy BM, Burford DA An investigation of tool design and welding parameters on fatigue life in FS welded 2024-T3. In: The 7th international friction stir welding symposium. Awaji Island, Japan, 20–22 May 2008Google Scholar
  37. 37.
    Jurak SF (2011) In: Asmatulu R, Burford D, Lankarani H (eds) Statistical analysis of the mechanical properties of friction stir welded AA2024 and AA2198 aluminium alloys. Wichita State University (WSU), Wichita, KansasGoogle Scholar
  38. 38.
    Jurak S, Burford D, McCoy M (2013) Analysis of mechanical and metallurgical properties of friction stir butt welded AA2024. In: Mishra R, Mahoney MW, Sato Y, Hovanski Y, Verma R (eds) Friction stir welding and processing VII. Wiley & Sons, San Antonio, TX, pp 183–194Google Scholar
  39. 39.
    Widener C, Tweedy B, Burford D An investigation of tool design and welding parameters on fatigue life in FS welded 2024-T3. In: The 7th international friction stir welding symposium. Awaji Island, Japan, 20–22 May 2008Google Scholar
  40. 40.
    Burford D, Tweedy B, Widener C (2007) Evaluation of friction stir weld process and properties. CECAM & AMTAS, 10 July 2007 [Online]. https://www.jams-coe.org/Presentations/2007-Wichita. Accessed Sept 2018
  41. 41.
    Rice R Statistical analysis of friction stir weld round-robin test data. In: 17th MMPDS coordination meeting: emerging materials working group (ETWG). Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 29 April 2010Google Scholar
  42. 42.
    AMS AMEC Aerospace Metals and Engineering Committee, SAE International. https://www.sae.org/works/committeeHome.do?comtID=TEAAMSAMEC. Accessed Oct 2018
  43. 43.
    Burford D, Widener C, Brown J (2008) Evaluation of friction stir weld process and properties for aircraft application: MMPDS initiatives. The FAA Joint Advanced Materials and Structures Center of Excellence, Everett, WashingtonGoogle Scholar
  44. 44.
    Burford DA, Widener CA (2009) Evaluation of friction stir welding process and properties for aerospace application: standards and specifications development. The FAA Joint Advanced Materials and Structures Center of Excellence, Wichita, KansasGoogle Scholar
  45. 45.
    Burford D (2011) Material performance/property specifications and standards for friction stir technologies. In: AMEC meeting no. 214, Asilomar Conference Center Pacific Grove, CA, 21 Jan 2011Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Joining Innovations, LLCWichitaUSA

Personalised recommendations