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Microstructural Characterisation of a High Strength Steel Subjected to Localised Blast Loading

  • Simon Higgs
  • Ali Ameri
  • Juan Pablo Escobedo-DiazEmail author
  • Brodie McDonald
  • Huon Bornstein
  • Zakaria Quadir
  • Tayla Nankivell
  • Wayne Hutchison
Conference paper
Part of the The Minerals, Metals & Materials Series book series (MMMS)

Abstract

The blast response of a High Strength Steel (HSS), classified as a High Hardness Armour (HHA), subjected to a 60 g charge mass at a Stand-Off Distance (SOD) of 25 mm has been investigated. Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) and microhardness measurements were used to determine the microstructural evolution in the through thickness and the associated mechanical properties changes. Results show that the blast wave travelling through the material increased the deformation and reduced the grain size. These observations correlated with the hardness increasing along the direction of travel of the blast wave.

Keywords

Armour steels Blast testing Microstructural evolution 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by DST-G Melbourne. The authors would like to thank the UNSW Canberra Technical Support Group (TSG) for their assistance in sample preparation and testing. Acknowledgment also goes to Curtin University Microscopy and Microanalysis Facility for their assistance with EBSD.

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Copyright information

© The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Simon Higgs
    • 1
  • Ali Ameri
    • 1
  • Juan Pablo Escobedo-Diaz
    • 1
    Email author
  • Brodie McDonald
    • 2
  • Huon Bornstein
    • 2
  • Zakaria Quadir
    • 3
  • Tayla Nankivell
    • 1
  • Wayne Hutchison
    • 4
  1. 1.School of Engineering and Information TechnologyUNSW-CanberraCanberraAustralia
  2. 2.Defence Science and Technology Group (DST-G)Fishermans BendAustralia
  3. 3.Microscopy and Microanalysis Facility (MMF)John de Laeter Centre (JdLC), Curtin UniversityPerthAustralia
  4. 4.School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical SciencesUNSW-CanberraCanberraAustralia

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