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Terrorism: An Overview

  • Olumuyiwa Temitope Faluyi
  • Sultan Khan
  • Adeoye O. Akinola
Chapter
Part of the Advances in African Economic, Social and Political Development book series (AAESPD)

Abstract

The chapter reviews the salient literature on terrorism and examines its historical origin, evolution and nature. It also unravels the difference between terrorism and other forms of political violence, and the categorization of Boko Haram as a terrorist group. Finally, the chapter probes the conceptual clarification of counter-terrorism and locates it in global epistemology. Conceptions of terrorism and its modus operandi vary slightly across countries and its diverse nature has also influenced the variations prevalent in counter-terrorism.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Olumuyiwa Temitope Faluyi
    • 1
  • Sultan Khan
    • 2
  • Adeoye O. Akinola
    • 3
  1. 1.School of Social SciencesUniversity of KwaZulu-NatalPietermaritzburgSouth Africa
  2. 2.School of Social ScienceUniversity of KwaZulu-NatalDurbanSouth Africa
  3. 3.Faculty of Commerce, Administration & LawUniversity of ZululandKwaDlangezwaSouth Africa

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