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Bulgaria

  • Krassimira Daskalova
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, Daskalova examines debates surrounding history teaching in Bulgaria since the 1990s. The major controversies in the ‘history war’ centre around the legacy of state socialism, and the question of its inclusion in teaching and textbooks; the nature of history to be taught, whether political, social, or cultural; the ‘periodisation’ of Bulgarian history, including the relationship to the Ottoman period; and the ongoing issue of what students need to know about the common European past, and how Bulgaria is presented to a wider, European public. Revisionist measures have been perceived to be violations of Bulgarian national identity, characterised as a ‘social pandemia’. Internal symbolic struggles and the presentation of a balanced picture of the European heritage remain ongoing challenges.

Further Reading

  1. Daskalova, K. ‘Education and European Women’s Citizenship: Images of Women in Bulgarian History Textbooks’. In Women’s Citizenship and Political Rights, edited by S. K. Hellsten, A. M. Holli and K. Daskalova, 107–126. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.Google Scholar
  2. Iordachi, C. ‘Entangled Histories: Re-writing the History of Central and Southeastern Europe from a Relational Perspective’. Revue en ligne ‘Etudes Européennes’ 15 (2004): 1–13, accessed 5 June 2017, http://www.etudes-europeennes.eu/.
  3. Liakos, A. ‘History Wars: Questioning Tolerance’. In Discrimination and Tolerance in Historical Perspective, edited by G. Halfdanarson, 77–92. Pisa: Plus-Pisa University Press, 1998.Google Scholar
  4. Roth, K. ‘Between the Ottoman Legacy and the European Union: On the Utilisation of Historical Myths in Bulgaria’. In From Palermo to Penang. A Journey into Political Anthropology/De Palermo à Penang. Un itinéraire en anthropologie politique, edited by F. Ruegg and A. Boscoboinik, 179–191. Vienna: LIT Verlag, 2010.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Krassimira Daskalova
    • 1
  1. 1.Modern History and History DidacticsSapienza University of RomeRomaItaly

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