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The Early Modern Period: Emerging Global Processes and Institutions

  • Julia Zinkina
  • David Christian
  • Leonid Grinin
  • Ilya Ilyin
  • Alexey Andreev
  • Ivan Aleshkovski
  • Sergey Shulgin
  • Andrey Korotayev
Chapter
Part of the World-Systems Evolution and Global Futures book series (WSEGF)

Abstract

The early modern period witnessed the emergence of a number of processes and institutions that were to acquire global scale and have a significant impact on the structure of globalization. In this chapter, we will focus on three processes. The first is related to the invention of the printing press, which triggered the Second Information Revolution in the history of humankind. This dramatically reduced the cost of books, contributing to the democratization of literacy, and also facilitated the mass printing of periodicals, which involved increasing numbers of people into information networks. The second process is the so-called “Military Revolution”—a radical change in military organization, provision, strategy, tactics, and weaponry that resulted in political and administrative changes in many areas of the World System, and led to its major restructuring. The third process is the formation of modern statehood, which prompted the appearance of “global thalassocracies” and a number of modern institutions, whose concepts gradually became integrated worldwide.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julia Zinkina
    • 1
  • David Christian
    • 2
  • Leonid Grinin
    • 3
  • Ilya Ilyin
    • 4
  • Alexey Andreev
    • 4
  • Ivan Aleshkovski
    • 5
  • Sergey Shulgin
    • 1
  • Andrey Korotayev
    • 3
  1. 1.Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public AdministrationMoscowRussia
  2. 2.Macquarie UniversitySydneyAustralia
  3. 3.Higher School of EconomicsNational Research UniversityMoscowRussia
  4. 4.Moscow State UniversityMoscowRussia
  5. 5.Faculty of Global StudiesMoscow State UniversityMoscowRussia

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