Advertisement

Conclusion: The Big History of Globalization Told in Ten Pages

  • Julia Zinkina
  • David Christian
  • Leonid Grinin
  • Ilya Ilyin
  • Alexey Andreev
  • Ivan Aleshkovski
  • Sergey Shulgin
  • Andrey Korotayev
Chapter
Part of the World-Systems Evolution and Global Futures book series (WSEGF)

Abstract

Numerous approaches to studying globalization co-exist in global research of the phenomenon, which is perfectly understandable, as the multitude of its manifestations permeate nearly all spheres of human life from the individual level to the whole world. In this book we choose to view the history of globalization along the Big History lines, tracing the increasing complexity of trans-border interactions and flows paralleled by the emergence and spread of global institutions and processes. In this chapter, which concludes the book, we challenge ourselves with fitting the first four periods of the history of globalization (from its earliest signs coming with the Neolithic Revolution to the first “golden age” of globalization in the decades prior to World War I) and their major innovations and watersheds into ten pages.

References

  1. Abu-Lughod, J. (1989). Before European hegemony: The world system A.D. 1250–1350. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Bayly, C. A. (2004). The birth of the modern world, 1780–1914: Global connections and comparisons. Malden: Blackwell Publishing.Google Scholar
  3. Brown, T. A., Jones, M. K., Powell, W., & Allaby, R. G. (2009). The complex origins of domesticated crops in the fertile crescent. Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 24(2), 103–109.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Chase-Dunn, C., & Hall, T. D. (1997). Rise and demise: Comparing world-systems. Boulder: Westview Press.Google Scholar
  5. Headrick, D. R. (2009). Technology: A world history. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Holton, R. J. (2011). Globalization and the nation state (2nd ed.). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Hopkins, A. G. (Ed.). (2002). Globalization in world history. London: Pimlico.Google Scholar
  8. Hopper, P. (2007). Understanding cultural globalization. Cambridge: Polity Press.Google Scholar
  9. McNeill, W. H. (1982). The pursuit of power: Technology, armed force, and society since AD 1000. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. McNeill, J. R., & McNeill, W. H. (2003). The human web: A bird’s-eye view of world history. New York: W.W. Norton.Google Scholar
  11. Modelski, G. (2008). Globalization as evolutionary process. In G. Modelski, T. Devezas, & W. R. Thompson (Eds.), Globalization as evolutionary process: Modeling global change (pp. 11–29). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  12. Parker, G. (2013). Global crisis: War, climate change, and catastrophe in the seventeenth century. New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  13. Robinson, W. I. (2007). Theories of globalization. In G. Ritzer (Ed.), The Blackwell companion to globalization (pp. 125–143). Malden: Wiley-Blackwell.Google Scholar
  14. Zohary, D., & Hopf, M. (2000). Domestication of plants in the old world. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julia Zinkina
    • 1
  • David Christian
    • 2
  • Leonid Grinin
    • 3
  • Ilya Ilyin
    • 4
  • Alexey Andreev
    • 4
  • Ivan Aleshkovski
    • 5
  • Sergey Shulgin
    • 1
  • Andrey Korotayev
    • 3
  1. 1.Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public AdministrationMoscowRussia
  2. 2.Macquarie UniversitySydneyAustralia
  3. 3.Higher School of EconomicsNational Research UniversityMoscowRussia
  4. 4.Moscow State UniversityMoscowRussia
  5. 5.Faculty of Global StudiesMoscow State UniversityMoscowRussia

Personalised recommendations