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Introduction

  • Maiya MurphyEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Cognitive Studies in Literature and Performance book series (CSLP)

Abstract

Murphy introduces the ways in which the theatre pedagogy of Jacques Lecoq and the cognitive scientific paradigm of enaction can shed light on each other. By articulating the central tenets of enaction and the basic principles of Lecoq pedagogy, Murphy highlights their shared conviction in the intimate relationship between embodiment, cognition, and meaning-making. Murphy gives a historical outline of both Lecoq pedagogy and enaction, and points to why they are particularly apt conversation partners. She outlines the interdisciplinary conversations upon which she builds and points to the vibrancy of debates at the intersections of theatre, performance, and the cognitive sciences. Murphy discusses the significance of the actor-creator, the origin of this term, and why this figure is so important in Lecoq pedagogy.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National University of SingaporeSingaporeSingapore

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