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Demoi-cracy: A Useful Framework for Theorizing the Democratization of Multilevel Governance?

  • Achim HurrelmannEmail author
  • Joan DeBardeleben
Chapter
Part of the Comparative Territorial Politics book series (COMPTPOL)

Abstract

The concept of demoi-cracy has gained prominence in democratic theory, especially in applications to the European Union. This chapter explores whether it can inform scholarship on multilevel governance (MLG). The chapter starts by taking stock of challenges that MLG implies for democracy. It then reviews theories of demoi-cracy to assess how they address these challenges. The discussion reveals ambiguities in demoi-cratic theorizing, which are spelled out by distinguishing four variants: (1) demoi-cracy as consociationalism, (2) demoi-cracy as variable multilateralism, (3) demoi-cracy as network governance, and (4) demoi-cracy as multi-venue contestation. In principle, demoi-cracy—particularly in its fourth understanding—has the potential to make a valuable contribution to MLG scholarship, by highlighting the embeddedness of MLG in overlapping political communities and providing normative guidelines for the reconciliation of conflicting democratic objectives. However, the concept must be further specified, in dialogue with MLG approaches, to allow for this potential to be realized.

Keywords

Demoi-cracy Democracy European Union Legitimacy Multilevel governance 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Political ScienceCarleton UniversityOttawaCanada
  2. 2.Institute of European, Russian and Eurasian Studies (EURUS)Carleton UniversityOttawaCanada

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