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Introduction: Bangladesh Responds to Climate Change

  • Helena WrightEmail author
  • Adrian Fenton
  • Saleemul Huq
  • Clare Stott
  • Julia Taub
  • Jeffrey Chow
Chapter
Part of the The Anthropocene: Politik—Economics—Society—Science book series (APESS, volume 28)

Abstract

Bangladesh is a country that is highly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, and a broad range of practices have emerged to adapt to these impacts. The book presents a range of sectors that are affected by the impacts of climate change, such as agriculture, water and health, as well as covering thematic areas relating to responses to climate change, such as governance and finance, communication and gender. Measures to adapt to climate impacts in the agricultural sector range from hard engineering measures like construction of polders, to soft socio-economic measures, such as changes in cropping patterns. In the water sector, non-structural approaches to risk reduction include community-based disaster management initiatives. Across all practice areas there are barriers and challenges to confronting the impacts of climate change, including knowledge gaps. The chapters of this book emerged as part of the Gobeshona initiative in Bangladesh, a knowledge sharing platform for climate change research on Bangladesh.

Keywords

Bangladesh Adaptation Climate Impacts Poverty 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Helena Wright
    • 1
    Email author
  • Adrian Fenton
    • 1
  • Saleemul Huq
    • 1
  • Clare Stott
    • 1
  • Julia Taub
    • 2
  • Jeffrey Chow
    • 1
  1. 1.International Centre for Climate Change and Development (ICCCAD)DhakaBangladesh
  2. 2.Global Network of Civil Society Organisations for Disaster Reduction (GNDR)LondonEngland

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