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Numerical Modeling for Time-Dependent Problems

  • Bahman Zohuri
Chapter

Abstract

The possibility of a plutonium-fueled nuclear-powered reactor, such as a fast-breeder reactor that could produce more fuel than it consumed, was first raised during World War II in the United States by scientists involved in Manhattan Project and the US Atomic Bomb Program. In the past two decades, the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Japan, and India followed the United States in developing a nationalized plutonium-breeder reactor programs, while Belgium, Italy, and the Netherlands collaborated with the French and German programs. In all of these programs, the main driver of this effort was the hope of solving the long-term energy supply problem using the large-scale deployment of fissional nuclear energy for electric power. Breeder reactors, such as plutonium-fueled breeder reactors, appeared to offer a way to avoid a potential shortage of the low-cost uranium required to support such an ambitious vision using other kinds of reactors, including today’s new generation of power reactors known as GEN-IV.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bahman Zohuri
    • 1
  1. 1.Galaxy Advanced Engineering, Inc.University of New MexicoAlbuquerqueUSA

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