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Movement in the Box: The Production of Surreal Social Space and the Alienated Body

  • Joel HawkesEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter examines the glass box presented in the opening episode of Twin Peaks: The Return as a central metaphor for American society and its inhabitants: a physical and cultural space that has become ever more surreal as inhabitants’ lives are increasingly mediated through the screen (the box). The chapter explores Lynch’s mapping of modern America as a confusing space, with residents who have become, like the creature that manifests in the box, dehumanized figures, isolated, and alienated from each other and from themselves, trapped behind a screen and within a society where life and art blur. The box is a portal through which we access the show and our own lives.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of VictoriaVictoriaCanada

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