Advertisement

Effect of Applied Potential and Inhibitors on PbSCC of Alloy 690TT

  • Brent CapellEmail author
  • Jesse Lumsden
  • Michael Calabrese
  • Rick Eaker
Conference paper
Part of the The Minerals, Metals & Materials Series book series (MMMS)

Abstract

Alloy 690TT has been shown to be susceptible to lead stress corrosion cracking (PbSCC) at pHT values of 9.1 and above and with no cracks occurring at lower pHT values like 8.5. Previous work on PbSCC has been completed at the open circuit potential (OCP). A test program has been completed at applied electrochemical potentials for Alloy 690TT at pHT values of 8.5 and 9.5. Testing has shown sporadic PbSCC occurrence at pHT 8.5 which previously showed no cracking although an exact causal factor was not identified. At pHT 9.5, applying a potential did not stop PbSCC from occurring, although at +75 mV applied potential there was the inclusion of an apparent incubation time where none had previously been observed. To minimize to PbSCC, scoping testing was completed on four candidate inhibitors at pHT 9.5. Three of the four inhibitors tested (TiO2, H3BO3, and CeB6) showed reductions in maximum crack depths compared to testing without an inhibitor. Although promising, inhibitors still require additional testing before widespread use can be recommended.

Keywords

PbSCC Alloy 690TT Inhibitor Lead Secondary side 

References

  1. 1.
    Steam Generator Management Program: Steam Generator Progress Report—Revision 18, EPRI, Palo Alto, CA, 2013. 3002002201Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Proceedings: 2005 EPRI/ANL/NRC Workshop on Effects of Lead and Sulfur on the Performance of Secondary Side Tubing of Steam Generators in PWRs, EPRI, Palo Alto, CA, 2005. 1012780Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Summary of Analytical Electron Microscopy Observation of Intergranular Attack and Stress Corrosion Cracks in Alloy 600 Steam Generator Tubing, EPRI, Palo Alto, CA, 2005. 1011683Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    P.J. King, F. Gonzalez, J. Brown, Stress Corrosion Cracking Experience in Steam Generators at Bruce NGS. Proceedings of Sixth International Symposium on Environmental Degradation in Nuclear Power Systems—Water Reactors, the Minerals, Metals and Materials Society, Warrendale, PA, 1993, p 233–243Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    F. Vaillant, D. Buisine, B. Prieux, Comparative Behavior of Alloy 600, 690 and 800 in Caustic Environments. Proceedings of the Seventh International Symposium on Environmental Degradation of Materials in Nuclear Power Systems—Water Reactors, National Association of Corrosion Engineers, Houston, TX, 1995Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Steam Generator Management Program: Conditions Causing Lead Stress Corrosion Cracking of Steam Generator Tubing: Alloy 690TT, EPRI, Palo Alto, CA, 2013. 3002000490Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    P. Wolfe, R. Eaker, J. Lumsden. PbSCC of Alloy 690TT and Alloy 800NG Steam Generator Tubing in Alkaline Conditions, Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Environmental Degradation of Materials in Nuclear Power Systems—Water Reactors, National Association of Corrosion Engineers, Houston TX, 2013Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Capell, B., Wolfe, R., Lumsden, J., Eaker, R. PbSCC of Alloy 800NG Steam Generator Tubing in Alkaline Environments, Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Environmental Degradation of Materials in Nuclear Power Systems—Water Reactors, Canadian Nuclear Society, Toronto, Canada, 2016Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    MULTEQ: Equilibrium of an Electrolytic Solution with Vapor-Liquid Partitioning and Precipitiation: The Database Version 7.0, EPRI, Palo Alto, CA, 2012. 1025010Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Titanium Dioxide Application Guidelines, EPRI, Palo Alto, CA, 1997. TR-108002Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Correlation of Secondary-Side IGA/SCC Degradation of Recirculating Steam Generator Tubing with the On-Line Addition of Boric Acid, EPRI, Palo Alto, CA 1992. TR-101010Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brent Capell
    • 1
    Email author
  • Jesse Lumsden
    • 2
  • Michael Calabrese
    • 2
  • Rick Eaker
    • 3
  1. 1.Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)CharlotteUSA
  2. 2.Teledyne Scientific and Imaging CompanyThousand OaksUSA
  3. 3.HKA EnterprisesDucanUSA

Personalised recommendations